Emotional Support

  • Jeffrey Neurman

    Surviving Incurable Cancer With the Help of Humor

    The Help of Humor Six years ago, soon after the birth of my second son, I acknowledged my 40th birthday. (I say acknowledged – and not “celebrated” – as I do not know of anyone who ever rejoiced at the notion of hitting forty, even if it is the new 30, which I never heard […]

  • Jean Ellsworth-Wolk

    Mom as an Advocate

    My journey as an AYA advocate/nurse/mom began 12 years ago in tears on a surgical waiting room bathroom floor. y 19-year-old daughter had gone into a routine surgery with a presumed diagnosis of a large fibroid and came out with the life changing diagnosis of dysgerminoma (germ cell ovarian cancer, female version of testicular cancer).

  • Steve Giallourakis

    My Name is Steve and I Am a Drug Addict

    Two months earlier I had just finished my treatment for my first cancer. It was a 10-month journey filled with two spine surgeries, countless chemotherapy treatments and five weeks of radiation. During those 10-months I developed a fondness for my pain medication. I didn’t have that much pain that night, but I was sad and feeling alone.

Wellness

  • Jay Carter

    Just Keep Moving: The Benefits of Staying Active During Treatment

    At 26 years old, I was at the peak of my physical fitness. When not at work, you could find me lifting weights in the gym, or outdoors running trails. My social outings consisted of tennis matches and wake boarding sessions on the lake.

  • Angie Giallourakis

    Mom’s 6 Tips: Staying Well During Cancer Treatment

    We know that a cancer diagnoses is incredibly stressful and frightening. A person’s emotions are usually over the top – and yet, we know that in order to survive this horrible ordeal the patient needs physical and emotional nourishment while in treatment.

  • Marloe Esch

    Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy

    What we put in our bodies can have a major impact on how we feel throughout treatment, so it’s important to think of good nutrition as part of your treatment plan, and to make it a priority. 

Jen's Corner

  • Jennifer Anand

    Parenting Young Adults with Cancer

    You’re our parents. You know us at our best and our worst. Heck, you created us! But you are our parents. Every time we look at your face, we see the pain of our hearts reflected in our eyes.

  • Jennifer Anand

    Thriving Cancer

    Thriver doesn’t define my cancer status. It tells you nothing of where I’m at on my cancer journey. It tells you that I’m here, showing up and doing what I can. It doesn’t define me to have finished cancer treatments. It means I’m doing the best I can, where I am, at this point in my life.

  • Jennifer Anand

    Finding My Hope

    My “last meal” pre-hospitalizaiton was actually a delicious corned beef dinner. My transplant was the day after St. Patty’s day. Every year